10 beautiful beaches in Corfu

port Timon

The warm turquoise waters of the Ionian Sea are hard to beat. From tiny pockets of pebbled perfection hidden under fir and pine trees along the somewhat swanky but still pristine northeast coast to surprisingly long, wide swaths of golden sand to the west, there’s a beach to keep everyone happy. Families gravitate towards the larger beaches, equipped with lounge chairs, with easy access to a tavern or two, and full of water sports. The more adventurous take on rocky trails that lead to the island’s most secluded and surprisingly beautiful swimming spots.

For more Corfu inspiration, see our guides to the island’s best hotels, restaurants, nightlife and things to do.

northeast coast

Kalami

Horseshoe-shaped Kalami Bay attracts beach-going families and sailing yachts to its sheltered waters and pebble shores, fringed with olive and pine trees, and blooming with colorful flowers in spring. In this natural playground that was so beloved by the Durrell family, young people swing, mesmerized, on the edge of wooden jetties in search of underwater life. Yachts moor their dinghies at the pier below the White House, the Durrells’ former home, checking into the local restaurant for steamed cockles in the sun. Rent a boat to visit the quieter neighboring bays or tune in to the old-world rhythm of a paddleboat.

Getting there: Green bus A4 to Kassiopi

Kalami

Kalami

barbati

The long, narrow beach of Barbati is located at the foot of the imposing Pantokrator Massif – the highest mountain in Corfu – at 906 m (2,972 ft). Barbati is known for its flat white pebbles that show clear, translucent waters. Couples in particular frequent this beach, lounging on the many lounge chairs and ordering espresso freddo at beach bars that double as restaurants. Bathers can satisfy their appetite in the shade of the eucalyptus trees. There is easy road access and parking is available. Arrive early to get a good spot on the beach.

Getting there: Green bus A5 to Barbati-Nisaki

barbati

barbati

kaminaki

Simple cottages in shades of pale yellow and salmon cluster around Kaminaki Beach in the eponymous village, which has barely changed over the years. Stuffed with pebbles and sand, this small beach has a handful of umbrellas and attracts devout regulars looking for an annual dose of sunny serenity. Children spend hours snorkeling on the rocks at either end of the beach. Boat rentals and water sports such as stand up paddle and water skiing are available. Spiros Mavronas and his wife Sue run an old-fashioned seaside tavern, Spiros Taverna Kaminaki, which serves classic Greek dishes such as their grandmother’s oven-roasted vegetable dish. brim.

Getting there: Green bus A5 to Barbati-Nisaki

kaminaki

kaminaki

glyfada

Framed by a verdant mountainous backdrop dotted with holiday apartments and two hotels, the long, sandy Glyfada is one of Corfu’s busiest beaches. Families love it, as there are ample umbrellas and lounge chairs, a few beachfront taverns, and drinks available. Locals and visitors flock to the Pazuzu beach bar for sunset parties with international DJs. If you prefer a more serene setting, stick to the northern end of the beach, which is well protected from the wind that sometimes blows in from the Adriatic. Myrtiotissa, exclusively for naturists, which Lawrence Durrell enthusiastically described as the most beautiful beach in the world, is a short drive to the north.

Getting there: Green bus B17 to Glyfada

glyfada

glyfada

Kontogialos

A winding road gently descends through the village of Pelekas to the beach of Kontogialos, passing olive trees that descend the slope. Families love this sweeping curve of a beach that measures about 30 meters wide for its golden sand and shallow emerald waters. Once a hippie haven, Kontogialos also attracts a young crowd thanks to its relative proximity to Corfu Town. Umbrellas and lounge chairs are plentiful, though there’s plenty of space to spread out a towel. To the north is a tiny beach hidden in the shadow of an impressive craggy rock that rises from the sea.

Getting there: City bus 11 to Pelekas

Kontogialos

Kontogialos

That

Issos beach is perhaps the most spectacular beach on the island. About a mile and a half (two and a half kilometers) long, this untamed stretch of fine, golden sand sits beneath tall, undulating sand dunes. Explore the dunes, where sand orchids grow, and a rare cedar forest that reaches the shores of Lake Korission, Corfu’s most significant swamp habitat. There are sun loungers at the south end, however it is quieter the further north you go which makes it popular with naturists. With its constant winds and calm seas, Issos is ideal for windsurfing and sailing catamaran beginners who can rent a kit. Bring wine and treats to celebrate a sublime sunset.

Getting there: Green bus B6 to Issos

That

That

Halikounas

The seemingly endless beach of Halikounas, separated from Issos by a small rock cap, winds along about three kilometers and ends at Lake Korission. Families tend to prefer the north end, where there are a few lounge chairs, while those looking for some privacy head south. It is also one of the best kitesurfing and windsurfing spots in Corfu, so it attracts the most experienced, who bring equipment or rent it on site. Visit in the late afternoon and wait for the sun to cast a tan glow on this narrow strip of soft, tawny sand. You’ll find it hard to resist a solitary, invigorating run along a wild, almost empty beach.

Getting there: best reached by car

northwest coast

Green Pink

Shortly after entering Paleokastritsa and before reaching the bustling main beach of Agios Spyridon, you’ll find the perfect Verderosa tucked beneath a cliff. Descend stone steps lined with green and red railings to the small stretch of sand on a pebble beach where orange and yellow chaise lounges match the scorching sun and painted palm trees on the faded exterior of a once-existing restaurant. If this beach had a soundtrack, it would be reggae. A favorite with couples for its tranquility, Verderosa enjoys views of the small harbor of Paleokastritsa, where boats can be rented to reach inaccessible beaches like Stelari.

Getting there: Green bus A9 to Paleokastritsa

Green Pink

Green Pink

Agios Stefanos Avliotes

The length and breadth of the Agios Stefanos Avliotes are guaranteed to stir the heart of even the most seasoned swimmer. This open sandy expanse is more reminiscent of those in Australia. No matter that there are sun loungers and umbrellas galore, nature has provided endless space for you to find your own piece of solitude. The shallow waters make it great for children and a gentle, regular breeze is welcome in the height of summer. Taverns, restaurants and cafes are nearby, as are beach supplies. Small ferries depart from here to the Diapontia islets of Erikousa, Mathraki and Othoni.

Getting there: Green bus A1 to Agios Stefanos

Agios Stefanos Avliotes

Agios Stefanos Avliotes

port Timon

It takes a good 20-25 minutes to navigate the winding rocky path from the village of Afionas to Porto Timoni, but the reward is a lifetime memory of experiencing one of Greece’s great beaches. Many young families with babies in their arms barely falter on the walk. It comprises two pristine sandy coves with crystal clear seas of aquamarine facing each other, which means that when viewed from a small viewpoint on the trail, they are stunning. The east facing beach is most beautiful in the early hours of the day and the west side is clearly made for lovers of sunsets and intertwining.

Getting there: Green bus A6 to Afionas-Arillas

port Timon

port Timon

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