Actors who hated being in James Bond movies

Not everyone loved their time in the world of 007. (MGM/Eon)

The James Bond series is one of the most successful movie franchises of all time, and not every actor dreams of starring in one. Some even signed on, only to loathe every minute of doing so.

So here are just a few of the actors, male and female, who regretted their time on that 007 stage…

Sean Connery

Actor Sean Connery and actress Akiko Wakabayashi on the set of You Live Only Twice.  (Photo by Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images)

Actor Sean Connery and actress Akiko Wakabayashi on the set of You Live Only Twice. (Photo by Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images)

“I’ve always hated that damn James Bond, I’d like to kill him,” Sean Connery once declared. Rarely shy about expressing his exasperation with the character and the series (after meeting Ian Fleming, who dismissed the actor as ‘an overdeveloped stuntman’, Connery labeled him ‘a real snob’), things came to a head in his fifth film. , 1967 You only Live Twice. The actor was harassed by paparazzi and fans in Japan and even allegedly being photographed in the bathroom.

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Announcing that he had broken up with Bond, he was left out. To Her Majesty’s Secret Servicebefore being drawn back to 1971 The diamond is forever with a tasty check for £29 million (which he donated to charity) plus 12.5% ​​of gross profits (which he kept for himself).

“I had been [messed] about too much in other Bond films,” he told The Guardian. “There are so many bulls that come from bad decisions made at the top.”

He came back as 007 one last time in Never Say Never Again – a rival Bond film made by another studio – primarily to get revenge on producer Albert R Broccoli.

George Lazenby

Actors Irvin Allen (left) and George Lazenby (standing) on ​​the set of the James Bond film 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service', Portugal, 1969. (Photo by Larry Ellis Collection/Getty Images)

Actors Irvin Allen (left) and George Lazenby (standing) on ​​the set of the James Bond film To Her Majesty’s Secret Serviceon location in Portugal, 1969. (Larry Ellis Collection/Getty Images)

Considering how doggedly he fought for the role of James Bond, one would have thought that former model and face of Fry’s Chocolate Cream George Lazenby would have been a heartthrob while filming. To Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Except he was, according to many who worked on the film, a little difficult on set.

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Moneypenny actor Lois Maxwell revealed ‘he wasn’t very professional’ and Lazenby’s relationship with director Peter Hunt deteriorated to the point that Hunt wouldn’t even speak to him. Meanwhile, her co-star Diana Rigg wrote an open letter to The Daily Sketch writing: “I agree that by the end of the movie most of the crew were hostile, but only because of their extreme behavior. Why else would your dresser threaten to deliver your notification?

Australian actor George Lazenby and English actress Diana Rigg relax on the set of the 1969 James Bond film 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service'. (Photo by Larry Ellis Collection/Getty Images)

George Lazenby and Diana Rigg relax on the set of the James Bond movie To Her Majesty’s Secret Service1969. (Photo by Larry Ellis Collection/Getty Images)

“Why would three more drivers leave you in a week? Why was one more member of the unit prevented from hitting you after an unforgivable and rude outburst against one of the girls in the movie?”

Lazenby, who left the franchise after that one film, believing the Bond films had their day, reflected on his experience: “They made me feel like I was stupid. They disregarded everything I suggested, simply because I didn’t film industry like them about a thousand years ago.”

Yaphet Kotto

Actors Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto, Julius W. Harris and actress Jane Seymour, on the set of

Actors Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto, Julius W. Harris and actress Jane Seymour, on the set of Live and Let Die. (Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images)

He may have only been 33 years old when he rehearsed the role of drug kingpin Kananga in Roger Moore’s inaugural Bond film. Live and Let Diebut Yaphet Kotto had only bad things to say about the film and writer Tom Mankiewicz’s script.

“I had to dig deep into my soul and brain and come to a level of reality that compensated for the sea of ​​stereotypes that Tom Mankiewicz wrote that had nothing to do with black experience or culture,” said the actor.

Even the character’s death, which caused Kanaga to explode after swallowing a pellet of compressed gas, Krotto criticized as “a joke”. Roger Moore later wrote that Kotto had “a chip in his shoulder”. Asked in 2007 how he got along with his co-star, Kotto simply replied: “I have nothing to say about Roger Moore.”

Jane Seymour

Actor Roger Moore and actress Jane Seymour on the set of

Roger Moore and Jane Seymour on the set of Live and Let Die. (Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images)

Yaphet Kotto was not the only one Live and Let Die actor unhappy to find himself cast in a James Bond film. Jane Seymour was just 21 when she landed the role of Kananga psychic and Bond lover Solitaire, but, as she recently told EW, it wasn’t quite what she wanted from her nascent acting career: “I was the only female on the planet this wasn’t trying to be a Bond girl, literally… I was going to do Shakespeare and Ibsen and all the classics.”

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She went on to say that despite her reservations, she took the job incredibly seriously, while for the producers, “they were probably more concerned about my appearance and my figure”.

Teri Hatcher

Irish actor Pierce Brosnan stars as 007 alongside actress Teri Hatcher as Paris Carver in the 1997 James Bond film 'Tomorrow Never Dies'. (Photo by Keith Hamshere/Getty Images)

Irish actor Pierce Brosnan stars as 007 alongside actress Teri Hatcher as Paris Carver in the 1997 James Bond film ‘Tomorrow Never Dies’. (Photo by Keith Hamshere/Getty Images)

His role in 1997 Tomorrow Never Dies It may not be big, but Teri Hatcher was, at the time, a huge star for the Bond series.

O Lois & Clark The actor had been hired to play Paris Carver, the wife of cowardly media mogul Elliot Carver and a former James Bond, but Hatcher was no fan of Paris or the film series he joined.

“It’s such an artificial kind of character to play,” she groaned, “you don’t get any special satisfaction from it.”

the soon desperate housewife she was apparently not the best timekeeper, although it was later discovered that she was pregnant and suffered from morning sickness.

Pierce Brosnan told Vanity Fair: “I was very upset with her – she was always keeping me waiting for hours,” adding, “I must admit I blurted out a few words that weren’t very pleasant.”

Gemma Arterton

Daniel Craig and Gemma Arterton in 'Quantum of Solace'.  (Credit: Eon/Sony)

Daniel Craig and Gemma Arterton in Quantum of comfort. (Eon/Sony)

“I was 21, I had a student loan and, you know, it was a Bond movie,” Gemma Arterton told The Sun about her role as agent Strawberry Fields in 2008. Quantum of Solace.

In the years since, however, the actress has come to regret her courtship with the Bond franchise, telling The Daily Telegraph in 2020: “She was funny and sweet, but she really didn’t have anything to do — or a backstory,” Arterton confessed to the newspaper.

“As I got older, I realized there was so much wrong with Bond women, Strawberry should have just said no, really, and worn flats.”

In 2018, Arterton rewrote Fields’ part for a book. Feminists don’t wear pink (and other lies), via a fictional diary entry for the character. In it, she refutes Bond’s advances, after noticing his ‘toady comment’ upon meeting him.

“I’m not interested in flirting with you – I’m here to work,” she writes.

Jesper Christensen

Mr.  White (Jesper Christensen) on the set of the Panic Room, having just been discovered by Bond on Specter.  (MGM/Sony Pictures)

Mr. White (Jesper Christensen) on the set of the Panic Room, having just been discovered by Bond on Specter. (MGM/Sony Pictures)

Given what Craig-era actor Jesper Christensen said about the Bond franchise in 2010, it’s amazing that Eon welcomed him back in 2015. Spectrum. “Today, I admit that I consider [Casino Royale] and [Quantum Of Solace] like really s***,” the White actor told reporters at the Berlin Film Festival, saying he was glad his “interlude as a villain in the James Bond series is over.”

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Well, he might have thought that except seven years later, he was invited back for a final outing, and by this point Christensen seemed more at peace with his Bond fame. “I’m looking forward to working with Sam Mendes and Daniel Craig,” he said before filming began. Spectrum. “It’s a really exciting script and a very capable crew, so it’s going to be fun.”

Daniel Craig

Spectrum (MGM/Eon/Sony Pictures)

Spectrum (MGM/Eon/Sony Pictures)

Daniel Craig never held back from sharing the miserable time he worked Spectrum. By all accounts, it was a pretty hellish shoot. Not only was the script leaked, but a memo was also released that showed how much Sony was struggling with the film’s third act and how the film had gone over budget.

Add to that Craig breaking his leg and it’s no wonder why he was fed up. “I’d rather break this glass and slit my wrists,” Craig told Time Out when asked if he would play 007 again, adding, “If I did another Bond movie, it would just be for the money.”

He returned, of course, to 2021 No Time to Die, saying about the previous interview: “I needed a break. A little more responsiveness could have been better.”

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