Why ‘The Black Phone’ avoids Spielberg nostalgia

Why ‘The Black Phone’ avoids Spielberg nostalgia

Watch: Scott Derrickson on How to Regain Nostalgia in the black phone

Need a break from all this Weird stuff-nostalgia fed? Well then, Scott Derrickson’s new horror the black phonein theaters now, it might be just what you’re looking for.

“I love Weird stuff, I really want to,” the director told Yahoo in an interview. “I’m on episode five of the new season. It’s amazing. But I got tired of consistently seeing stories where high school kids in this kind of paranormal, you know, fantastical movies always came from the same suburban universe as Spielberg.

“I felt like we’re always playing an entire era of growth through the window of what Steven Spielberg’s legacy really was.”

See More information: Netflix releases trailer for Weird stuff S4 part 2

the black phoneadapted from the 2004 short story by Joe Hill (son of legendary horror author Stephen King), it follows a boy named Finney Shaw (Mason Thomas).

Ethan Hawke as The Grabber in The Black Phone, directed by Scott Derrickson.

Ethan Hawke as The Grabber in the black phone, directed by Scott Derrickson. (Universal Photos)

On a clear day, in the middle of the sidewalk outside his school, Finney is attacked and thrown into a van by a masked man known only to him as The Grabber (Ethan Hawke). He wakes up in a basement. All there is is an old mattress and an unplugged phone.

Derrickson, with his film, is directly based on the main fears and paranoia of the late seventies, from the release of influential films like Friday 13 and Halloweenthe massive cultural changes that followed the Manson murders and the gruesome carnage of serial killers like Ted Bundy and John Wayne Gacy.

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It’s an attempt to capture a little bit of the director’s own childhood, spent in Denver in the late seventies.

“I grew up in a rough neighborhood,” Derrickson said. “It was a working-class neighborhood where people were fighting all the time, bleeding all the time. Everyone’s parents were very abusive. Everyone has the belt or worse.

(from left) Finney Shaw (Mason Thames) and Gwen Shaw (Madeleine McGraw) in The Black Phone, directed by Scott Derrickson.

Finney Shaw (Mason Thames) and Gwen Shaw (Madeleine McGraw) in the black phone, directed by Scott Derrickson. (Universal Photos)

“My own friend next door knocked on my door when I was nine. And I opened the door and he was crying and he said, ‘Someone murdered my mother.’ His mother had been kidnapped and raped and wrapped in telephone wire and thrown away. the local lake. My main association with my own childhood is fear. I just remember being afraid all the time.

For a movie as disturbing as the black phoneit became an immediate priority that its young cast feel safe and supported on set at all times.

Speaking to Yahoo, Mason Thomas joked that Ethan Hawke gave him ‘a noogie to the head’ to lighten the mood between takes in the film’s central abduction scene. “I think I have a picture of it somewhere,” he added.

(from left) The Grabber (Ethan Hawke) and Finney Shaw (Mason Thames) in The Black Phone, directed by Scott Derrickson.

The Grabber (Ethan Hawke) and Finney Shaw (Mason Thames) in the black phone, directed by Scott Derrickson. (Universal Photos)

Madeleine McGraw, who plays Finney’s sister Gwen, also praised Derrickson’s approach to such sensitive material. “We talked a lot before this very intense scene that we had to do, which helped me a lot because I was so nervous,” she said.

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“One of the best parts of working with Scott was that we felt like he was always there for us no matter what.”

the black phone It’s already in theaters. Watch a trailer below.

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